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Learning in lock-down: online tourism education for teachers and students

It has been over three months since Covid-19 hit Europe and forced many countries to lock themselves down: large groups were not allowed anymore, #stayhome became the new normal and public transport and the streets have never been so empty. The tourism industry has been affected by many natural disasters, as well as political and economic turmoil, but when the whole world locked down due to the Coronavirus, many challenges were faced by European destinationsREAD MORE

Robots and digitals skills in post-pandemic tourism

COVID-19 as a driver of robotisation in tourism and hospitality

The COVID-19 pandemic put serious pressure on tourism and hospitality (TH) companies. Hotels, restaurants, travel agencies, visitor attractions, sports facilities, event centres and other companies had to close their premises for several weeks as part of government measures to curb the spread of the virus. Their financial resources were depleted and some went into default.

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What is the real situation regarding digitalization in German destinations?

The abbreviation DMO once stood for Destination Marketing Organisation and the work of a DMO concentrated on marketing the region by means of classic “push” advertising campaigns. As a result of digitalisation, many tasks have changed and a DMO is increasingly acting primarily as a destination management organisation.

Within the NTG Consortium, the DSFT is actively working on the implementation of content in a DMO competence matrix. The tasks and competencies anchored in this matrix are based on, among other things, the view that the DMO must set an example of leadership in digital issues to the actors in the region in order to keep pace with digitisation. The same applies to the management level of the DMO towards its own team. The right know-how and mindset is crucial for this. The DMO – together with a network of institutions – is therefore often responsible for the “digital” further education of (tourism) service providers. READ MORE

European Commission addresses the relevance of the Next Tourism Generation project

The Communication from the European Commission of May 13 on Tourism and transport in 2020 and beyond represents a small but significant milestone for the Next Tourism Generation project. In an official document of one of the most important institutions of the European Union, a prestigious acknowledgement of the importance and value of the project is formally expressed, through the reference that is made to the work we are carrying out and even to our website www.nexttourismgeneration.eu.READ MORE

Skills sets in education and the tourism and hospitality industry in corona times

In this two series blog, the Next Tourism Generation (NTG) Consortium present their perspective on the impact of Covid-19  in terms of challenges related to skills development, how these may change and what the impacts may be on tourism sub-sectors during and after the crisis. Covid-19 has had a major impact on the tourism and hospitality industry. NTG consulted Consortium partners on the impact of Covid-19 on digital, green and social skills development and employability skills, including the challenges that the sub-sectors in tourism and hospitality are facing.READ MORE

Challenges and the importance of skills in tourism sub-sectors during and after Covid-19

In this two series blog, the Next Tourism Generation (NTG) Consortium present their perspective on the impact of Covid-19 in terms of challenges related to skills development, how such challenges may change and what the impacts may be on tourism sub-sectors during and after the crisis. In this blog, NTG focuses on the importance of the development of skills and potential impacts on the sub-sectors during and after the Covid-19 crisis.READ MORE

To App or not to App

Using mobile applications in destination marketing for small cities and remote destinations

There are thousands of tourist destinations around the world, from small tourist attractions to entire countries, from capitals to remote villages. Arguably, the most important quality of any tourist destination and all of its stakeholders is whether it is successful or not i.e., whether it accumulates more economic benefits than economic costs (Robinson, et.al, 2013). It is a fact that successful destinations are not only marketed in a modern, innovative and creative way, but also managed in the same manner (Morrison, 2013). Nowadays, efficient destination management and marketing requires more diverse skills in order to address the high competition and stand out from the rest. The proper usage and integration of modern technologies are one of the most important tools in this process. Therefore, the development of digital skills becomes crucial for successful destination management organisations (DMOs).READ MORE

Cybersecurity in Tourism & Hospitality: the urge of protecting customer data

Organizations in tourism and hospitality have massive databases of personal data nowadays as they ask their consumers to leave their data for better and optimized services. This could be in hotels for example, provide data for loyalty programmes such as preferences of pillows, favourite breakfast and date of birth. However, important information such as e-mail addresses, passport numbers and even creditcard details are being given in order to complete the reservation. Next to that, new technologies also enable guests to check in more efficiently, for example with a mobile application which holds a lot of personal data in order to be able to have a fast check-in. However, according to HotelNewsNow (2018), hackers are often attacking the hospitality industry on the search for secured data. Therefore, managers in tourism and hospitality, but also all other employees in the different departments in the sub-sectors should be aware of the high risks those hacks bring along.

This blog, written by key partner CEHAT, focuses on the importance of cyber security and what skills should be taught to all workers in tourism and hospitality in order to ensure the protection of all the valuable personal data of their guests. In this line, CEHAT collaborates with ITH as the technological arm for the dissemination of this information through international events such as Fiturtech Y, technical conferences throughout Spain and communication through ITH’s newsletter.

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10 key characteristics of Gen Z to keep in mind in travel

Generation Z represents a new generation of youngsters with specific characteristics due to the period of time in which they were born. They offer new opportunities for the tourism sector, mainly from the digital skills point of view, but also because this generation is highly committed to social and green issues. So how does this generation influence different sub-sectors in our industry? Key NTG partner, the University of Alicante, highlights the key characteristics of Gen Z and shares some interesting facts.READ MORE

Digitalization in Hungary’s tourism – the case of Budapest

Changing travel patterns require various tourism industry sub-sectors to adapt to the wide-ranging needs of customers. With the increase in leisure time, most people travel several times a year. Next to that, new destinations are being introduced; cheap flights are offered by multiple airlines, while the consumer decision-making process becomes even shorter. A Next Tourism Generation Alliance key partner, the University of Sopron, looks into ‘new platform services’ (UNWTO, 2017) and how digitalisation is bringing radical changes to tourism and hospitality. The blog explores a cutting edge robot café and an innovative smartphone-controlled hotel in Budapest, Hungary. READ MORE